students

Measuring Success from the Start

There is no denying that schools focus and measure their academic success with their 12th grade graduation rates. The idea being: the higher the graduation rate, the more successful the school is in educating their students. However, schools in Chicago are now taking a different approach to measuring and bolstering their success rates.

Based on the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research, schools are implementing the “Freshman On Track Indicator.” Ninth grade students are measured and categorized after one semester or quarter in school. Components such as behavior, absences, and grades are compiled and categorized into green, yellow, and red indicators of being on track. Green is on track, yellow is sliding off track, and red is off track to graduation.

According to the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research (2005), students predicted to be off-track in 9th grade have a higher likelihood of not graduating in 12th grade. The opposite also applies. On track students are more likely to graduate come their senior year of high school. Rather than using standardized test scores and background characteristics to predict graduation rates, educators now are able to more accurately catch an off track student and give them the resources they need.  The transition from middle school to high school is often a difficult one for students. Using this model, parents and educators would carefully monitor high school freshmen for any changes in behavior and grades. By being proactive, the students are given more time to improve slipping grades.  Students marked as “on track” are 3.5 times more likely to graduate than their “off track” peers. Tracking the grades and behaviors of students beginning their first semester in high school can drastically improve graduation rates. This method focuses on catching slip ups before students are ineligible to graduate.  For more information about the On Track Indicator, visit the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research  website .    At KlickEngage, we are working to ensure that children in low-income communities have equal opportunity to succeed academically. Want to learn more? Ask us a question      here     .

According to the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research (2005), students predicted to be off-track in 9th grade have a higher likelihood of not graduating in 12th grade. The opposite also applies. On track students are more likely to graduate come their senior year of high school. Rather than using standardized test scores and background characteristics to predict graduation rates, educators now are able to more accurately catch an off track student and give them the resources they need.

The transition from middle school to high school is often a difficult one for students. Using this model, parents and educators would carefully monitor high school freshmen for any changes in behavior and grades. By being proactive, the students are given more time to improve slipping grades.

Students marked as “on track” are 3.5 times more likely to graduate than their “off track” peers. Tracking the grades and behaviors of students beginning their first semester in high school can drastically improve graduation rates. This method focuses on catching slip ups before students are ineligible to graduate.

For more information about the On Track Indicator, visit the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research website.

At KlickEngage, we are working to ensure that children in low-income communities have equal opportunity to succeed academically. Want to learn more? Ask us a question here.